Apr 15, 2014
26,427 notes

spybrarian:

erikawithac:

a-golden-lasso-of-my-own:

Yay! Feminist Anthropology time!

Prehistoric Cave Prints Show Most Early Artists Were Women

I added the emphasis in bold, but the “that” was already italicized in the article, and it’s probably my favorite part. I love this article, although I’m not a huge fan of the fact that it’s considered so incredibly shocking and radical to imagine that women possibly participated in society 40,000 years ago.

In other awesome feminist anthropology news: it is now somewhat accepted that the venus sculptures, rather than being depictions of female beauty by male artists, were self-portraits by women looking down at their own bodies. The paleolithic figurines lose their distorted proportions and acquire representational realism if we understand that they are self-portraits created by women looking down at their own bodies. 

See also: This quote by Sandy Toksvig

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. ‘This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar’ she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’

It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions? How often had I sped past them as I learned of male achievement and men’s place in the history books? Then I read Rosalind Miles’s book The Women’s History of the World (recently republished as Who Cooked the Last Supper?) and I knew I needed to look again. History is full of fabulous females who have been systematically ignored, forgotten or simply written out of the records. They’re not all saints, they’re not all geniuses, but they do deserve remembering.

the willendorf sculpture and others like her were /the first selfies/ and its amazing

The paleolithic figurines lose their distorted proportions and acquire representational realism if we understand that they are self-portraits created by women looking down at their own bodies.

I really, really love this sentence.

(via kawahineaihonua)

Apr 15, 2014
374 notes

nokiabae:

London Style

Liz Johnson-Artur

November, 2001

(via kawahineaihonua)

Apr 15, 2014
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(via librisex)

Apr 15, 2014
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instvnct:

Great Egret | Tristan Dumlao

instvnct:

Great Egret | Tristan Dumlao

(via librisex)

Apr 14, 2014
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Apr 14, 2014
176 notes
mkonstantinova:

Irving Penn Still Life With Watermelon, 1947

mkonstantinova:

Irving Penn Still Life With Watermelon, 1947

(via uuiuu)

Apr 14, 2014
52 notes

(Source: suguptalekha, via feregjarat)

Apr 14, 2014
387 notes
shoulderblades:

a.f. vandevorst fall/winter 2003 photographed by ronald stoops

shoulderblades:

a.f. vandevorst fall/winter 2003 photographed by ronald stoops

(via vomdesgarcons)

Apr 14, 2014
247 notes
Apr 14, 2014
409 notes
sisterwolf:

Kazimierz Stabrowski 1910

sisterwolf:

Kazimierz Stabrowski 1910

(via librisex)

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